Aceh_Revives_cover

Author: Dr Noel Trustrum
Published by Saritaksu Editions, Bali

Book Specifications:
Size 28 x 24cm, 200 pages of contents
Approx. 130 full colour images
Hard-cover English launch August 2014
Hard-cover & Soft-cover Indonesian launch December 2014

A commemorative photo book

Celebrating the amazing spirit, resilience and achievements in Aceh, Indonesia since the devastating earthquake and tsunami of 2004 that decimated so many coastal communities, in print.

The photographer, Dr Noel Trustrum had the opportunity to work alongside the many people and organisations that contributed to the relief, recovery and rehabilitation efforts in Aceh directly after the tsunami, and has since returned to further document the recovery.

The bravery of the local people, many of whom lost their entire families and belongings, left such a strong impression with Noel that he published a small book “SCARS: Life after the Aceh Tsunami”, featuring a time-sequence of photographs depicting landscapes, people and the journey from desolation to recovery during a nine month period following the Tsunami. Noel and his team have researched a number of powerful untold stories and interviewed key people involved in the recovery process for this photo book highlighting the resilience of the people and lessons learnt.

Dr Kuntoro Mangkusubroto, founder of Indonesia’s BRR Institute (for Rehabilitation and Reconstruction), endorses this publication.

A compilation of images and inspirational stories
Working closely with Saritaksu Editions, a publisher based in Bali we have created a book that gives a voice to the photos and enables the Acehnese people, survivors and those involved in the recovery to tell their own story.

Aceh revives label

Book price NZ$60 (plus postage).
Email:
info@tenikau.co.nz

 


 

 

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of ‘Tom Hutchins – Seen in China 1956’ exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

 

Report from Stu Sontier at Pingyao International Photography Festival, 2016.

The festival is well under way now and the craziness of hanging and captioning well behind us. This year, John Turner has curated an approx 100 image show of Tom Hutchins work from 1956, and I am here as the PhotoForum representative.

We both arrived on the 17th with the exhibition to open on the 19th. There was no sign of our framed prints so we killed time meeting a local photographer friend of John’s.

The following day we, and our 3 assigned helpers, had to first unpack and then arrange the pictures in order. Then came the task of arranging them on the wall, with less space than we had expected.

We gradually worked our way through a number of problems including missing pictures and reformatting and printing captions, finishing late in the evening. Although without captions on the wall. Throughout the hanging we already had a stream of people coming through, peering closely, taking pictures of the pictures and pictures of us with the pictures, and selfies with the pictures. Pictures of anything it seemed.

The following morning we were treated to what can only be called an extravaganza of Chinese proportions, with huge video displays showing bizarre cartoons for some unknown reason. There were some formal speeches as there are at such things but the main purpose seemed to be to get the foreign photographers out in public and subject them to what they sometimes impose on others. Again we were photographed photographing our peers photographing all manner of subjects and in a sign of the time we were also filmed from above by several drones.

The military, police and swat teams were all out in force but generally used just to keep the photographers under control. After these formalities and another million pictures added to the global stock bank, we came back to our show to interact with the audience.

Pingyao is awe inspiring to say the least, with the work of 200 overseas and 2000 Chinese photographers on show. The visitor number is huge too and an uncountable number are moving through the space, with greater or lesser levels of interest. John has been interviewed numerous times with at least two TV crews being on the list. We’ve also started visiting a few of the many other exhibitions and meeting some of the many local and overseas photographers. That includes the other NZ contingent, who are part of a curated show by Rosanna Raymond and organised by the Auckland Festival of Photography. The show, Ata Te Tangata, showcases Pacific Island photographers with a range of cultural interests. Four of the photographers, and the curator are in Pingyao, and all, with John, participated in the “Dialogue with NZ Curators and Photographers” with a good audience turnout.

The festival continues for another two full days and as a first time visitor, I can recommend attending if you want a mix of culture shock, great food, misinterpreted English and Chinese (learn a little), and an awful lot of photography covering many genres and at many levels, from top local and international names, to outstanding student work.

 

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

Installation of 'Tom Hutchins - Seen in China 1956' exhibition curated by John B. Turner, Pingyao International Photography Festival, September 2016.

 

 

In this beautiful publication, Peter Alsop celebrates the iconic photography of Whites Aviation.

Hand-coloured-NZ-01

 

Hand-coloured New Zealand
The Photographs of Whites Aviation

Author: Peter Alsop
Format: Hardback with jacket
Pages: 408
Size: 305 x 276mm
Publication date: November 2016
Publisher: Potton and Burton
ISBN: 9780947503154

Every single photo coloured by hand? Using cotton wool? Yes, such was the era of hand-coloured photography – a painting and photograph in one – the way you got a high-quality colour photo before colour photography became mainstream.

Some of New Zealand’s best hand-coloured photos were produced by Whites Aviation from 1945. For over 40 years, the glorious scenic vistas were a sensation, adorning offices and lounges around the land; patriotic statements within New Zealand’s emerging visual arts. Now, despite massive changes in society and photography, the stunning scenes and subtle tones still enchant, as coveted collectibles; decorations on screen; and as respected pieces of photographic art.

But, until now, the inspirational story has not been told; nor have the full stories of Leo White (company founder); Clyde Stewart (chief photographer and head of colouring); and the mission-critical ‘colouring girls’.  Hand-Coloured New Zealand also presents New Zealand’s first published collection of hand-coloured photography, and the most extensive published collection of such photography in the world. MORE

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Hand-coloured-NZ-03

Hand-coloured-NZ-34

Hand-coloured-NZ-41

Hand-coloured-NZ-15

 

To help the book get off to a good start,  a pre-release discount of 20% off and free postage in New Zealand is being offered (Use Coupon code WHITES). Ordering is through the publishers site, and will be dispatched immediately on arrival in October.

To coincide with the publication release, Peter Alsop and Greg Wood have co-directed The Colourist – a charming three minute doco featuring Whites Aviation ‘colourist girl’ Grace Rawson, (now in her eighties). The short film is well worth viewing. You can watch it HERE.

 

 Murray_Cammick_Invite_Flash_Cars


Murray Cammick
Flash Cars

The Black Asterisk Gallery – 10 Ponsonby Rd, Auckland August 3 to 31 2016

After a 40-year absence, the classic Queen Street V8 images, shot in the late 1970s by photographer Murray Cammick are making a return to Auckland at Ponsonby’s The Black Asterisk Gallery from August 3 to August 31. The exhibition will include the classic documentary images that are known, plus photos that have never been seen before of the cars and the people that roamed Auckland’s main street, late at night.

In 1974, while still a student at Elam School of Fine Art, Cammick began photographing people and their V8 cars as they congregated late at night in Auckland’s Queen Street. When the theatre patrons went home, the city’s main street was their place to park-up or cruise.

Cammick spent many weekend nights from 1974 to 1981 photographing the scene. While he documented the V8s, his mode of transport was a diminutive Morris Minor that he hid in a side street. Cammick was a shy and naïve 20 year old when he started this series and revellers would see his SLR camera and hassle him to – “take our photo!” – unaware that they were giving the quiet photographer the opportunity (and images) he was looking for.

In 1977 Cammick and long-time friend Alastair Dougal established RipItUp music magazine. After he photographed concerts for RipItUp he headed for Queen Street – but as the eighties got underway – the Queen Street V8 scene faded. A later photo might be a single car moving through the bleak environment, looking for a scene that is no longer there. The dark, empty street has a character of its own and starts to takeover the images.

When he ended his involvement with RipItUp magazine in 1998, he set out to do a series of photographic exhibitions but was thwarted by the digital takeover of photography and the realisation that key images from his Flash Cars series were missing – last seen in the 1980s. In mid-2014, the missing negatives were found, allowing a comprehensive exhibition to be undertaken. Jenny Tomlin, a specialist in the field of silver gelatin printing has made the new prints for the show.

Cammick’s Queen Street photographs are represented in the Te Papa National Gallery & Museum, Wellington. His photographs have been published in Art at Te Papa (2009), NZ Photography Collected (2015, Te Papa Press), PhotoForum at 40: Counterculture, Clusters, and Debate in New Zealand (2014, Rim Books), Into The Light: A History of New Zealand Photography (2006, Craig Potton Press), and Photo-Forum issue 39 (1977, PhotoForum Inc.)

Flash Cars has been shown at Snaps Gallery, Auckland in 1976 and 1977 and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney in 2015. The photographer’s photos have also appeared in group exhibitions including The Active Eye (Manawatu Art Gallery 1975), Drive (Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth 2000) and History in the Taking: 40 Years of PhotoForum (2014).

The Black Asterisk Gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday 11am to 5pm.

http://www.blackasterisk.co.nz/exhibitions/flash-cars

Sue Gee - From Guangdong to Aotearoa exhibition

From Guangdong to Aotearoa – Sue Gee

5 Feb 2016 to 1 May 2016
J.T. Diamond Reading Room  & Gallery, Level 2, Waitakere Central Library,
3 Ratanui St, Henderson, Auckland

Hours
: Mon to Fri: 9am – 5.30pm (Thurs open til 7pm), Sat and Sun: 10am – 4pm
Parking:  Alderman Drive car park – 2hrs free.
Walk across the bridge into Trading Place and the steps going up to the library are straight ahead.

This exhibition uses images, sound-bites and text to trace the journey of six New Zealand born Chinese as they trace their ancestral roots back to Guangdong, South China.

Six remarkable NZBC (New Zealand Born Chinese) talk about their lives.

Born in Eketahuna, Rotorua, Tamaki Makauru & Manaia, Taranki, they trace their ancestral roots to Guangdong, South China, previously known as Canton Province. Sound bites, written excerpts & photographs reveal fascinating insights into a cultural group once described as “The fearful race“.

‘The oral history project From Guandgong to Aotearoa came about through my wish to know more of my ancestral heritage. My mother and father, Lily and Jack, were born in Opunake and Manaia, in Taranaki. As young people, they left Aotearoa NZ to spend several years in their Cantonese villages, learning to speak Chinese, and something of our Chinese customs. I never asked them questions about their time in Guangdong and after they died, deeply regretted it.

The exhibition was initiated by and created with tautoko – support – of the people at the West Auckland Research Centre, WARC.

The interviewees are Connie Kum, Suzanne Chan On, Gillian Young, Watson Kitt, Lily Lee and Elsie Wong.

I’ll be in the gallery from 2-4pm on Saturday 30th April, also from 2-4pm on the 1st of May.  Do come. See / hear the work, and join us for a cup of Chinese tea.’

Sue Gee

05022016 news photo. Simon Smith/Fairfax NZ. The launch of the oral history exhibition From Guangdong to Aotearoa on display at Henderson Central Library in Henderson, Auckland. Back row from left: Gillian Yang, Lily Lee, project manager Liz Bradley and Suzanne Chan On. Front row, from left: Elsie Wong, project interviewer Sue Gee, and Connie Kum. All the women except Liz and Sue were interviewed by Sue to share their stories in the exhibition.

05/02/16 news photo. Simon Smith/Fairfax NZ.
The launch of the oral history exhibition From Guangdong to Aotearoa by Sue Geeon display at Waitakere Central Library, Henderson, Auckland.
From left: (back row) Gillian Yang, Lily Lee, project manager Liz Bradley and Suzanne Chan On,  (front row) Elsie Wong, project interviewer Sue Gee, and Connie Kum.

lightfall michael e-flyer

 

LIGHTFALL in passing

Real pictures revisited

Michael Smythe reckons Cibachrome prints are real pictures with extra qualities that do not carry through to digitisation. That’s why he is re-framing and re-exhibiting the images first shown at Real Pictures Gallery 32 years ago back when it was in His Majesty’s Arcade.

Smythe did not set out to be an exhibiting photographer. He took to the camera when he realised his design practice was not challenging his creativity at its outer limits (because his clients and/or their customers were not demanding enough). He needed a personal pursuit which did not require the scrutiny and evaluation of anyone but himself.

Experiments with photography found direction in his twin brother’s VW Beetle as it hurtled along the road to Gundagai in 1981. With no time to stop on this Sydney to Melbourne road trip Smythe began snapping the passing scenery from the passenger seat. One shot stood out. The distant desolate landscape was stark and sharp against a leaden sky while the foreground could best be described as a green-brown scribble. That shot set him off on a quest to document the elusive landscape as we usually experience it — in passing.

Many attempts followed but he found the results unsatisfying, until one evening in 1984. He was in the back seat of a client’s Holden Commodore speeding home from a Taupo site visit (with another designforces partner in the front). Between Meremere and Mercer the late afternoon light was bouncing off the Waikato River and flashing through the trees. Smythe wound down the window, set a slow exposure and worked his way intuitively through his two remaining rolls of Ektachrome slide film.

The results left him gobsmacked. The eerie imagery and extraordinary strike-rate left him feeling more like a midwife than an artist. Although exhibiting had never been part of his photographic plan it seemed that the next phase in his own exploration had to involve printing, framing and contemplating the best shots as a group.

Motion Pictures ran at Real Pictures Gallery from 17 September to 5 October 1984. The Cibachrome prints — with their multi-layered emulsions — added an extra level of enrichment. Three or four prints sold. And that was it. All further efforts to capture anything like the same energy and atmosphere have fallen short. The designer /artist has moved on.

Smythe is re-presenting the Real Pictures Cibachrome prints in an exhibition entitled LIGHTFALL in passing at Blikfang art & antiques, Northcote Point, running from 4 March to 16 April.

FOOTNOTE: Earlier in 1984 Michael Smythe had stood as the Labour candidate in the East Coast Bays seat. Most non-Nats voted for Gary Knapp (Social Credit) to stop Murray McCully from winning the seat. But Smythe did beat New Zealand Party candidate David Phillips — the property developer who, four years later, demolished His Majesty’s Theatre, paved paradise and put in a parking lot.

 

 


PF Pingyao 2015 Title bannerExhibition banner, photograph credit: Barney Brewster, Shrouds c. 1980 (detail).

 

Collective Passion – Singular Visions
PhotoForum – A New Zealand Legacy

19 – 25 September 2015
Pingyao International Photography Festival
Pingyao, Shanxi Province, China

Curator: Nina Seja.
Exhibition coordinator: Ian Macdonald.

An exhibition of over 70 digitally presented images selected from the History in the Taking exhibition and PhotoForum at 40 book, offering the largest photography festival in China an insight in to the influence of PhotoForum on the photographic cultural landscaper of New Zealand over the last four decades.

Supporting exhibition information:
Wall text banner [pdf]
List of works banner
Ephemera banner
Note: for best viewing of  List of works & Ephemera banners, click on loaded images to enlarge.

Update 18/10/15: View a selection of images from  the  2015 Pingyao International Photography Festival at PhotoForum’s facebook Pingyao 2015 album.

Mark Adams, Clevedon garden_1978_ George Brown

 

MARK  ADAMS

Clevedon garden, 1978 – George Brown / Ihaka Paraone

September 4 – 25* 2015
Reception with Mark Adams, 5.30pm Friday 4th September

1978 images of a domestic garden, in Clevedon, which was full of carvings by George Brown / Ihaka Paraone.They stand in an unfamiliar relationship to the received assumptions about the carving ‘traditions’ and the carving histories as they have presented to the NZ public thus far.

The photographer says: “Looking at George’s garden with its Arawa whakapapa of carved stories, including the migration tradition, I saw Pakeha me standing there looking at and PAST those works to their context. An isolated farm house on a dairy farm where George lived alone, his family having moved into town.”

Earlier work by this photographer can be viewed here

This exhibition leads into our next touring out-reach exhibition: Celebrating Wood: back to the future; photographs by Laurence Aberhart accompanied by university & museum collection items, and scientific exhibits, selected by the host venues in response to the photographs.

McNAMARA GALLERY Photography Ltd
190 Wicksteed St. WHANGANUI 4500
NEW ZEALAND
Tuesday / Wednesday – Saturday 11 – 3 [often open to 6] or by appointment
* Please check website INFORMATION page for occasional closed days due to travel commitments
06 348 7320 / 027 249 8059 mcnamaraphotogal@xtra.co.nz
www.mcnamara.co.nz

 

John Fields _Gus Fisher Gallery

 

www.gusfishergallery.auckland.ac.nz  

Te Atatu Me Invitation
Te Atatu Me: photographs of an urban New Zealand village is also available from:
Rim Books    (visit also for info about this publication) 
PhotoForum (as part of the 2015/16  subscription period commencing 1st April 2015)

Related links:
Review – Peter Ireland (EyeContact)